Patient and Healthcare Provider Resource

Patient and Healthcare Providers Resource

OralChemoEdSheets.com, Patient + Healthcare Providers Resource

OralChemoEdSheets.com, the Patient and Healthcare Providers Resource

How to Categorize Cancer Therapy

There are more than 200 different medications for cancer. Many people call all of these “chemo,” but there are actually many different types.

There are more than 200 different medications for cancer. Many people call all of these “chemo,” but there are actually many different types.

CATEGORIZING “CHEMO” ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION CATEGORIZING “CHEMO” ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION There are more than 200 different medications for cancer. Many people call all of these “chemo,” but there are actually many different types. You may hear some of the following terms: All of these types of medications have a place in cancer treatment, and some medications fall into more than one of the categories above. The best treatment depends on cancer type, stage, and other factors. You may be treated with one type of medication, or multiple types combined. For more information, talk to your healthcare team or go to www.cancer.gov/about cancer/treatment/types. Type of Treatment Description Examples Chemotherapy (other names: chemo) • Kills fast growing cells, including cancer cells • Has been a key part of cancer treatment since the 1940s • 5 fluorouracil (5 FU®) • Capecitabine (Xeloda®) • Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) • Doxorubicin (Adriamycin®) • Paclitaxel (Taxol®) Hormone therapy (other names: hormonal therapy, endocrine therapy) • Acts on hormones in the body to slow or stop cancer growth • Used to treat breast, prostate, and neuroendocrine tumors • Bicalutamide (Casodex®) • Letrozole (Femara®) • Leuprolide (Lupron®, Eligard®) • Octreotide (Sandostatin®) • Tamoxifen (Nolvadex®) Targeted therapy (other names: tyrosine kinase inhibitor, kinase inhibitor, small molecule inhibitor) • Stops cancer growth by targeting its growth pathway • Developed based on a better understanding of cancer and why it grows • Bevacizumab (Avastin®) • Imatinib (Gleevec®) • Palbociclib (Ibrance®) • Rituximab (Rituxan®) • Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) • Venetoclax (Venclexta®) Immunotherapy (other names: immune therapy) • Helps your immune system to fight cancer • Atezolizumab (Tecentriq®) • Nivolumab (Opdivo®) • Pembrolizumab (Keytruda®) • Tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah®) Radionuclides • Kills cancer cells with radiation • Similar to other types of radiation, but administered as a medication • Radium 223 (Xofigo®) • Lutetium Lu 177 dotatate (Lutathera®) CATEGORIZING “CHEMO” ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Additional instructions

Managing Constipation

Managing constipation is when your bowel movements happen less often than normal or if your bowel movements are hard or painful to pass.

Managing constipation is when your bowel movements happen less often than normal or if your bowel movements are hard or painful to pass.

CONSTIPATION ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Constipation is when your bowel movements happen less often than normal or if your bowel movements are hard or painful to pass. There are things you can do to prevent constipation, including the following: Drink at least 8 glasses of fluid every day, such as water, fruit or vegetable juices, and other clear liquids, like broth, Pedialyte®, or sports drinks. Warm liquids, such as coffee and tea, may help. If you are able, try to stay active every day. Walking is a good form of exercise that is convenient and easy to do. Even short walks around the house can help keep your bowels moving. Eat foods that are high in fiber, such as fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, prunes, nuts, seeds, popcorn, and high fiber cereals. Your doctor may recommend medications to prevent or treat constipation. Take your medication as directed by your care team. Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: You have pain in your stomach. You have not had a bowel movement in more than 2 days. You are unable to pass gas. You have pain in your rectal area. You have a fever over 100.4°F. You are having nausea or vomiting with your constipation. Your stomach looks swollen or feels hard to the touch. Additional instructions Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient educational supplement. This summarized information represents a brief summary of supportive care information and other resources. This supplement does not cover all existing information related to the possible directions, doses, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with specific medication or adverse events and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this supplement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this side effect management by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the clinical information presented whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such patient management, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to education and managing adverse events should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Supplemental Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about cancer topics and adverse event management. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved

Managing Diarrhea

Managing diarrhea is when your bowel movements become more frequent and are watery, softer, or looser than normal.

Managing diarrhea is when your bowel movements become more frequent and are watery, softer, or looser than normal.

DIARRHEA ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Diarrhea is when your bowel movements become more frequent and are watery, softer, or looser than normal. To minimize the possibility of diarrhea, do the following: Avoid spicy, greasy, or fried foods. Avoid eating a lot of raw vegetables or fruits. Avoid high fiber foods, such as whole wheat breads, granola, and bran. Avoid gas forming foods, such as cabbage and broccoli. Avoid lactose containing products, such as milk and dairy products. Avoid beverages with caffeine and alcohol. To help you feel better, do the following: Drink plenty of clear fluids, at least 8–10 glasses per day. Examples include water, sports drinks, broth, weak decaffeinated teas, decaffeinated soft drinks, clear juices, and gelatin. Eat bland foods, such as bananas, applesauce, rice, noodles, white bread, toast, and chicken (without the skin). You may take over the counter medication for your diarrhea, as instructed by your healthcare provider, including the following: Loperamide (Imodium®); take 4 mg (2 tablets) for 1 dose, then take 1 tablet by mouth every 4 hours OR 1 tablet by mouth after each loose stool. Do not take more than 8 tablets in 24 hours. Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: You have 4 more than your normal number of bowel movements in 1 day. You have diarrhea or cramps for more than 1 day. Your rectal area is sore or bleeding. You feel dizzy. You have a fever of 100.4°F or higher. Additional instructions Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient educational supplement. This summarized information represents a brief summary of supportive care information and other resources. This supplement does not cover all existing information related to the possible directions, doses, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with specific medication or adverse events and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this supplement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this side effect management by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the clinical information presented whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such patient management, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to education and managing adverse events should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Supplemental Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about cancer topics and adverse event management. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved

Managing EGFR Skin Rash

Managing EGFR stands for "epidermal growth factor receptor," which can be targeted by certain cancer therapies. A common side effect of EGFR cancer treatment is an acne-like...

Managing EGFR stands for "epidermal growth factor receptor," which can be targeted by certain cancer therapies. A common side effect of EGFR cancer treatment is an acne-like...

EGFR SKIN RASH ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION EGFR stands for “epidermal growth factor receptor,” which can be targeted by certain cancer therapies. A common side effect of EGFR cancer treatment is an acne like skin rash that can occur mostly on the face, chest, back, arms, and scalp. The rash may have the following characteristics: It may look like acne, but it is not. It may appear red, swollen, crusty, and very dry. It may feel itchy, tender, painful, warm, or burning. It may cause the skin to change color after the rash has gone away. It usually starts and is worse within the first few weeks of treatment. It will go away after the treatment is stopped, but not right away. To lessen the severity of the rash, do the following: Avoid direct sunlight on the skin by applying PABA free SPF 30 sunblock and lip balm, and wear protective hats and clothing in the sunlight. Do not use tanning beds. Avoid products with perfumes, alcohol, benzoyl peroxide, or salicylic acid (anti acne products) because they can increase skin dryness and cause further irritation. Cleanse your skin regularly with a mild soap, such as Basis® or Cetaphil®, to keep the area from becoming infected. Limit showers with hot water because it can dry the skin. Instead, take short showers with warm water. After bathing, pat your skin dry, and while it is still a little damp, apply a non fragrance body cream. To treat the rash, your doctor may prescribe the following: A steroid cream to apply temporarily An antibiotic gel to apply to the affected area An antibiotic to take by mouth to help treat infection caused by the rash Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient educational supplement. This summarized information represents a brief summary of supportive care information and other resources. This supplement does not cover all existing information related to the possible directions, doses, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with specific medication or adverse events and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this supplement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this side effect management by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the clinical information presented whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such patient management, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to education and managing adverse events should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Supplemental Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about cancer topics and adverse event management. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved.FEDRATINIB ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION EGFR SKIN RASH ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: The rash becomes itchy, tender, or painful or looks infected (red, warm to touch). The rash is affecting your ability to carry out your normal daily activities. The appearance of the rash is bothering you. The rash continues to spread despite current treatment. Additional instructions Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient education guide. This guide represents a brief summary of the medication derived from information provided by the drug manufacturer and other resources. This guide does not cover all existing information related to the possible uses, directions, doses, precautions, warnings, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with this medication and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this guide is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this medication by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the medications whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such medications, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to taking this medication should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about oral cancer drugs. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved

Managing Hand-Foot Reaction

Hand-foot reaction (sometimes referred to as hand-foot syndrome) describes a common side effect of certain oral anticancer therapies...

Hand-foot reaction (sometimes referred to as hand-foot syndrome) describes a common side effect of certain oral anticancer therapies...

HAND FOOT REACTION ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Hand foot reaction (sometimes referred to as hand foot syndrome) describes a common side effect of certain oral anticancer therapies (e.g., capecitabine, sunitinib, cabozantinib) affecting the palms of the hand and/or bottoms of the feet. Hand foot reaction may cause the following: Redness Tingling Numbness Swelling Cracking of the skin Thickening of the skin at pressure points (similar to calluses) Pain while on the feet or while using hands for everyday tasks Hand foot reaction typically starts after a few weeks of treatment. It will go away after treatment is stopped, but not right away. What can you do to lessen the severity of hand foot reaction? Regularly apply a moisturizing cream. • Udder Cream and Bag Balm are two commonly used products. Urea cream (10%–20%) is helpful to use on thickened skin. Wear well fitted shoes as well as socks to avoid excess rubbing on the feet. Use gloves when working with your hands. Avoid exposure to heat (including hot water) on hands and feet. Wear SPF 30 or higher daily, or wear long sleeved shirts and pants. Pat your skin dry after washing hands and feet instead of rubbing with a towel. Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: You notice blistering of the hands and/or feet. You notice that it is painful to do everyday tasks with the hands and/or feet. Additional instructions

Managing Heartburn

Heartburn is often described as a burning sensation in the stomach or lower chest that rises toward the neck and occasionally to the back.

Heartburn is often described as a burning sensation in the stomach or lower chest that rises toward the neck and occasionally to the back.

HEARTBURN ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Heartburn is often described as a burning sensation in the stomach or lower chest that rises toward the neck and occasionally to the back. If you are currently taking heartburn medications (prescription or over the counter), please check with your healthcare team about whether these can be continued, as they may interact with your anticancer medications. Common heartburn medications include the following: Proton pump inhibitors (PPI): omeprazole (Prilosec®), esomeprazole (Nexium®), lansoprazole (Prevacid®) H2 blockers: famotidine (Pepcid®), ranitidine (Zantac®) Antacids: calcium carbonate (Tums®), sodium bicarbonate (Alka Seltzer®) Heartburn may be managed without medications by doing the following: Avoiding certain foods, such as chocolate, spicy foods, high fat foods, carbonated beverages, and peppermint Avoiding tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine Losing weight if you have had recent weight gain or are overweight Elevating your head and upper body in bed if symptoms are at night or while lying down Avoiding wearing tight fitting clothes Your care team may recommend certain medications to help relieve or lessen your heartburn. Take these medications as directed by your care team. Your care team may also ask that you take your heartburn medication and your anticancer medication at separate times. If you are not able to stop taking your heartburn medications and you are taking an interacting medication, your care team may recommend that you take your anticancer medication with 8–12 oz of seltzer water/club soda, or some other acidic beverage, which may help with absorption of your anticancer medication. Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: Severe or new heartburn symptoms Bloody or black tarry stools Persistent vomiting Unexplained weight loss Difficulty swallowing Additional instructions

Managing Nausea and Vomiting

Managing nausea and vomiting can be a side effect of cancer treatment and may include having an upset stomach, feeling queasy, and vomiting.

Managing nausea and vomiting can be a side effect of cancer treatment and may include having an upset stomach, feeling queasy, and vomiting.

NAUSEA AND VOMITING ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Nausea and vomiting can be a side effect of cancer treatment and may include having an upset stomach, feeling queasy, and vomiting. To prevent nausea or to feel better, do the following: Eat 5 or 6 small meals during the day instead of 3 big meals. Eat before you get too hungry. An empty stomach can make nausea worse. Eat foods that are easy on the stomach, such as dry cereal, white toast, and crackers, without liquids first thing in the morning. Try lemon, lime, or other tart flavored foods. Sip on fluids throughout the day, like water, juice, broth, and semi flat soda. Avoid strong odors and smells. If you are vomiting, do the following: Stop eating. Once you stop vomiting, start back on food slowly, beginning with clear liquids, then try mild foods, such as gelatin, bananas, rice, and toast. Your doctor can prescribe medications to help relieve or lessen your nausea or vomiting. Take your medication as directed by your doctor or nurse. Take your anti nausea medicine as soon as you start to feel nauseous. This is the best way to prevent vomiting. Sometimes you can take more than 1 medication to prevent or treat nausea. If needed, you can take these medications on a consistent schedule or 30 minutes before taking your cancer treatment to better control nausea. Call your care team if you experience any of the following symptoms: The anti nausea medicine you are taking is not working and you are experiencing nausea or vomiting. You are unable to drink fluids for more than 1 day due to ongoing nausea or vomiting. Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient educational supplement. This summarized information represents a brief summary of supportive care information and other resources. This supplement does not cover all existing information related to the possible directions, doses, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with specific medication or adverse events and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this supplement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this side effect management by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the clinical information presented whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such patient management, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to education and managing adverse events should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Supplemental Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about cancer topics and adverse event management. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved.FEDRATINIB ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION NAUSEA AND VOMITING ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Additional instructions Important notice: The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc. (NCODA), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) have collaborated in gathering information for and developing this patient educational supplement. This summarized information represents a brief summary of supportive care information and other resources. This supplement does not cover all existing information related to the possible directions, doses, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks associated with specific medication or adverse events and should not substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional. Provision of this supplement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or imply endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of this side effect management by ACCC, HOPA, NCODA, or ONS, who assume no liability for and cannot ensure the accuracy of the information presented. The collaborators are not making any representations with respect to the clinical information presented whatsoever, and any and all decisions, with respect to such patient management, are at the sole risk of the individual consuming the medication. All decisions related to education and managing adverse events should be made with the guidance and under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional. Permission: Supplemental Oral Chemotherapy Education (OCE) sheets are provided as a free educational resource for patients with cancer in need of concise, easy to understand information about cancer topics and adverse event management. Healthcare providers are permitted to copy and distribute the sheets to patients as well as direct patients to the OCE website for information. However, commercial reproduction or reuse, as well as rebranding or reposting of any type, are strictly prohibited without permission of the copyright holder. Please email permission requests and licensing inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved

Oral Oncology Treatment Terms

General Terms related to Oral Oncology Treatments.

General Terms related to Oral Oncology Treatments.

ORAL ONCOLOGY TREATMENT TERMS ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Chemotherapy treatment cycle A course of treatment that is repeated on a regular schedule with periods of rest between. For example, treatment for 2 weeks followed by 2 weeks of rest may be considered one treatment cycle. Hormone therapy This treatment affects hormone production. Hormones can cause certain cancers to grow (e.g., prostate and breast cancer). Hormones or other medicines may be given to block the body’s natural hormones, helping to slow or stop the growth of cancer. It is also called endocrine therapy, hormonal therapy, and hormone treatment. Medication adherence The extent to which patients take medicines as ordered by healthcare providers Oral chemotherapy Treatment with medicines given by mouth to kill cancer cells or stop them from growing Targeted therapy This type of treatment uses medicine to identify and attack specific types of cancer cells. It may cause less harm to healthy cells. There are many types of targeted therapies. Some block the action of certain enzymes, proteins, or molecules involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. Other types help the immune system kill cancer cells or deliver toxic substances directly to cancer cells and kill them. Targeted therapies may have fewer side effects than other types of cancer treatment. Bibliography National Cancer Institute. (n.d.). National Cancer Institute dictionary of cancer terms. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/publications/ dictionaries/cancer terms Osterberg, L., & Blaschke, T. (2005). Adherence to medication. New England Journal of Medicine, 353, 487–497. https://doi.org/10.1056/ NEJMra05010

Safe Handling of Oral Chemotherapy

How should I handle my drug before I take it? General Guidlines for the Safe Handling of Oral Chemotherapy.

How should I handle my drug before I take it? General Guidlines for the Safe Handling of Oral Chemotherapy.

SAFE HANDLING OF ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION How should I handle my drug before I take it? ɋ Wash your hands before and after touching the drug. ɋ Only you or a caregiver should handle your chemotherapy. Do not let anyone else touch the drug. Ɉ If your caregiver handles your drug, he or she should wear gloves. ɋ Never break, crush, chew, or open your tablets or capsules unless your doctor tells you to do so. How should this drug be stored? ɋ Find a place in your home to store your oral chemotherapy that is separate from your other prescriptions and overthe counter medicines. ɋ Store your drug in a place with a controlled temperature that is not in direct sunlight. Be sure children and pets cannot reach your pills. ɋ Read the drug package and any included papers. Make sure to look for any storage instructions for your drug. Some drugs should be kept in the refrigerator. What should I do if another person or a pet swallows or is exposed to my drug? ɋ Keep calm. ɋ Flush the area with water, if the skin was exposed. ɋ Call the Poison Control Center immediately at 1 800 222 1222. What should I do with leftover drugs if my treatment is changed or stopped? ɋ Do not put chemotherapy drugs in the garbage* or down the toilet. ɋ Store your oral chemotherapy in a safe place until you can return it. ɋ State or local medication disposal sites or drop boxes are available as below: *If you need to dispose of oral chemotherapy quickly, follow these instructions: ɋ Mix whole pills (do not crush or open) in used coffee grounds or cat litter. ɋ Place the mixture in a container (e.g., empty laundry detergent or bleach bottle) and put the lid on tightly. Alternatively, double bag the mixture in plastic storage bags. ɋ Place the sealed container in your household trash. Additional instructions

Specialty Pharmacy Insurance Terms

Specialty Pharmacy Insurance Terms.

Specialty Pharmacy Insurance Terms.

SPECIALTY PHARMACY INSURANCE TERMS ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY EDUCATION Appeal An appeal is a request for your health insurance to go back and review a decision that denies a drug or service. It is often needed if your health insurance denies a prior authorization. Coinsurance This is the percent of the cost for a health service or drug that you pay after you’ve paid your deductible. For example, you may have to pay 20% coinsurance for each drug after you have paid your deductible. Copayment (“copay”) A copay is a fixed amount you pay for a covered healthcare service after you’ve paid your deductible. For example, you may have to pay a $20 copay for each prescription after you have paid your deductible. Deductible A deductible is the amount you pay for covered healthcare services before your insurance plan starts to pay for these same services. If you have a $1,000 deductible, you would need to pay $1,000 of the covered services before your insurance starts paying. Formulary A formulary is a list of preferred drugs covered by a health plan that offers drug benefits. It is also called a drug list. Grant Grants are given by nonprofit companies to help with the cost for drug coinsurance, copays, deductibles, health insurance premiums, and other selected out of pocket healthcare costs. The availability of these may vary based on the disease or medicine. Patient assistance program (PAP) These programs are created to help patients who lack health insurance or drug coverage or are unable to pay for their medicine. They often are offered by drug companies to give low cost or free medicines to patients who qualify and do not have Medicare or Medicaid. Prior authorization A prior authorization is a choice by your health insurance that a healthcare service, treatment plan, or prescription drug is medically needed. It may also be called preauthorization, prior approval, or precertification. Your health insurance may require this for certain services before you get them. It is not a promise that your health insurance will cover the cost. Bibliography Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy. (2016). The AMCP format for formulary submissions (version 4.0). Retrieved from http://www.amcp.org/ FormatV4/ American Pharmacists Association. (n.d.). Pharmacy benefit management. Retrieved from https://www.pharmacist.com/sites/default/files/files/ Profile 24 PBM SDS FINAL 090707.pdf HealthCare.gov. (n.d.). Glossary. Retrieved from https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary National Council on Patient Information and Education. (n.d.). Understanding prescription assistance programs (PAPs). Retrieved from http:// www.bemedwise.org/documents/paps.pd

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